14 Mar Software review: DxO PhotoLab 4 brings several small improvements – and one big one

Source: DP Review

DxO PhotoLab 4
$129-199 Introduction

First launched in early 2004 under the name Optics Pro, DxO rebranded its Raw processor as PhotoLab back in 2017 to better reflect that its capabilities now go far beyond just lens corrections, and simultaneously absorbed the popular Nik Collection plugins from Google for integration into its own software. It has also shuttered its nascent hardware business altogether, and spun off its DxOMark camera, lens and smartphone testing lab as a separate company in 2017.

Now entirely focused on software development, DxO has nevertheless stayed the course with a perpetual licensing model for PhotoLab, eschewing the controversial subscription-based pricing that rivals like Adobe have used to increase revenues.

Since it’s a comprehensive digital darkroom application, I’m not going to aim to cover every feature of PhotoLab in this review. Instead, in the interest of readability, I’ll aim to hit the highlights while comparing improvements versus the previous release, and against its still-dominant Adobe rival as appropriate.

Key Takeaways: Competitive pricing, no subscription Class-leading (but slow) DeepPRIME noise reduction filtering Friendly and easy-to-learn user interface Great automatic lens and image quality corrections Good to great performance in most areas No support for multi-shot imaging or Fujifilm X-Trans images

DxO PhotoLab 4 is available immediately priced at US$129 for the Essential edition or US$199 for the Elite edition; the extra cost gets you PRIME / DeepPRIME ‘denoising’, batch renaming, moiré removal and more. There’s also upgrade pricing if you have a

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