c2a9osztaba_oil_sands_20160416__dsf2265-4d9f044414d98d74188d222626a6a7326f20cf34

25 Apr Manipulated Landscape – Part 2

Source: Olafs Photoblog

Named after the bituminous sands, Bitumount is a place where the story of the Oil Sands really began. Between 1925 and 1958, experiments separating oil from sand were performed and led to the birth of the technology used today.

The Great Canadian Oil Sands started the first large-scale mining operations in 1967. However, due to the high cost of extracting oil from bitumen, the investments and production didn’t pick up until 2000. Along with the rise in the price of oil, massive investment has been made, rapidly expanding the operations.

Extracting oil from sand has a large impact on the environment. Forests have to be cleared in order to establish open-pit mining. The mines might have a depth of 80 meters.

One of the side effects of such operations is the creation of tailing ponds, which contain the toxic sludge that is produced when bitumen oil is separated from the sand. These ponds now cover 176 square kilometres and hold enough liquid to fill the equivalent of 390,000 Olympic-sized swimming pools.

A large amount of heavy equipment is required to extract oil. The largest trucks in the world remove up to 720,000 tons of sand every day. Interesting fact: one tire costs as much as $60,000.

Mining operations at the sites are conducted 24/7. The majority of the workforce lives in remote camps, known as lodges.

There is a separate housing for women and

Manipulated Landscape – Part 2 posted on Olafs Photoblog on .

Read the full article on Olafs Photoblog
Home